Hive Takes Over @being_ulti!

Felix recently got his hands on the Being_Ulti twitter account. In case you missed it: here are the tweets gathered in one place for your viewing pleasure! (Click on the “Read the full conversation on Twitter” button to read the rest of each thread).

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Don’t teach your Beginners Stack

Article written by Noah Brinkworth

You probably know by now that we’re not massive fans of stacks here at Hive Ultimate. But there are specific and important reasons why stacks (particularly vertical and side stack – horizontal is not quite as bad) are detrimental to teach to beginners.

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How can we characterise offensive and defensive systems?

This article was written by guest authors Marie and Florian Gailliegue and is an excerpt from their book Ultimate in Motion: Balance and Dynamism, available from their website or currently part of the $25/mo Hive Swarm Tier deal.

Any situation in any spot of the field can be objectively characterised. Many factors combine – spatial (proximity to an endzone), positional (centering on the field), material (distribution of players) and initiative (separation / velocity, or other ability to dictate the tempo). During the game, each team will seek to tilt the advantages in their favour.

Strategy is long-term planning, and tactics are a sequence of calculated actions. Philosophy is from where one or more strategies flow. Structure guides how a strategy can be deployed effectively. Tactics are put at the service of the previous pillars to achieve the overall aim.

A structure is defined by the set of positions occupied by the players of a team. With 7 players, we can imagine a nearly infinite array of possibilities. When a strategy is decided upon, there are several structures that can be chosen to ensure the strategic goals are achieved. No matter the structure, the whole tactical toolbox remains at one’s disposal. The ensemble {Strategy, Structure, Tactics} creates a system. For the team to be as efficient as possible, the chosen system must match the philosophy.

ultimate systems

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Yina Cartagena talks BENT, Revo Pro and Becoming a World Class Player

Este artículo también está disponible en español

Yina Cartagena has been a stalwart member of Revolution Ultimate for over a decade. She has been a part of a Revolution side that have won the 11 consecutive national titles, the US Open in 2017, and the inaugural PUL championship in 2019. She has also represented Colombia numerous times, being a key part of Colombia’s strong 2017 World Games team, and lead in stats by far in the Colombian Women’s team that reached the 2016 WUGC final.

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How to Play Ultimate

How to Play Ultimate – by @ultimatekeira

How to Layout

How to Layout – by @ultimatekeira

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Ultiworld / EuroZone interview with Felix Shardlow

Head over to Ultiworld to catch the latest EuroZone Podcast, which includes an interview with Felix!

Click for more info / the topics covered!

0:00 Ravi & Liam talk about PELT’s Movember campaign
7:30 Ravi introduces me, begin lockdown chat
8:50 Story about the first time I played ultimate
11:50 Why I could already jump high when I started playing
12:50 Ravi asks about my playing history
17:25 Liam asks where I think I would be if I quit in 2010, we talk about Roller Derby for a while
18:25 Ravi asks ‘What is Flex?’ (I don’t give a very good explanation imo! At least compared to the videos)
23:00 Why I’ve been releasing my strategic ideas publicly and how they have been received (innovation in defence vs innovation in offence)
24:45 The importance of communication & field awareness in Flex
26:15 Liam asks “When you’re coming up with these new strategies, are you ever scared of being ‘Franked'”?
29:00 Ravi asks which clubs are using hex/flex philosophies in Europe / NA – I completely fail to mention the Sussex Uni team I coach
31:00 Talking about the development of offence in ultimate (American Football influence vs what it’d look like with more Soccer influence, Japan’s alternative style getting results)
32:55 Ravi asks about being a content creator – how did I get into video analysis etc? (I talk about how the “Japan v USA – Every Turnover of the match analysed” video came about)
36:40 Talking about the livestream series
37:30 Talking about what it’s like to work production crew at a tournament
38:40 Ravi asks why I stopped the livestreams
41:10 Ravi asks if I have any tips for people who might want to get into content creation
42:25 Liam asks how I find interaction with social media, where is the best reception and what do I find weird
44:15 felixultimate TikTok?
45:00 Rocket League tournament upcoming & Disc Space developments
48:00 Ravi & Liam talk about the Queen’s Gambit netflix show

I’m still scratching my head wondering how, when Ravi asked about teams that adopted hex/flex, I completely failed to mention the Sussex Uni club I’ve been coaching for 17 years, and who won Nationals in 2010, 2011, 2017 & 2019. Without training that club and running those sessions, a lot of the hex/flex stuff would still be theoretical and very untested. Implementing the ideas with Sussex week upon week, developing some ideas and throwing others out, and seeing how the teams perform against the others in the region and the country year upon year has kept the ideas fresh and allowed them to mature far beyond theory, to a point where I’m confident enough to produce videos on them. Can’t believe I barely mentioned Sussex – perhaps they’re somehow so close that I overlooked them? Probably just interview nerves. Anyway, I hope you enjoy the listen!

Colombia v USA @ World Games 2017: Choco’s story behind the Universe point call

#52 Mauricio ‘Choco’ Martinez speaks about the climactic play during universe point at the World Games 2017, where George Stubbs calls a foul on a layout D from Choco. This audio was recorded during the post-film session beehive Q&A / hangout on the felixultimate Discord – apologies for the audio quality. To join the discord server and get involved with future post-film-session Q&As, join the felixultimate beehive here.

Review: The Aria Uno disc

felixultimate reviews the new Aria Uno disc to hit the scene.
Aria website: https://www.aria-discs.com/
Discraft/Wham-O vote article: http://skydmagazine.com/2014/04/vote-wham-o-discraft/

… read transcript …

Transcript:

Hey everybody, in this video I’m going to be looking at the Aria disc which has recently hit the scene, and comparing it against the classic Discraft Ultrastar, with the brand new felixultimate design. The Eurodisc which has been around for a few years also makes an appearance. Let’s start by having a look at what people thought about the Aria.

Joe Butler: Feels a bit firmer around the rim
James Wortherspoon: A little tougher, actually
Anastastia Riordan-Eva: The rim feels slightly thicker
Joe: Very slight, but definitely not a negative difference
Starzy: Almost like there’s a dip here and then a dip here
Dan Cozens: I can safely say that after 20 years of playing, it feels no different whatsoever
Spoon: Pretty similar. The Aria flew nicer – might’ve been the wind because it’s quite gusty
Starzy: Feels good, feels like something you could use
Joe: Feels nice
Dan: Feels fine, I quite like this, it’s nice

People tended to like the feel of the Aria – there’s a slight difference in the rim. If I put them up like this you can see there’s slightly more angle on the Aria. You can barely tell when you’re holding it. You can see that the Aria is more see-through than the Ultrastar, which means that maybe the plastic in the middle is a bit thinner, but you can’t really feel that.
After throwing around a lot with the Aria, the Ultrastar feels a tiny bit more like a plate… it’s hard to explain… the weight is distributed more towards the edge in the Aria.
The Aria has some bend to it, it’s smooth, has a deep sound – the Ultrastar has a similar bend and deep sound. The Eurodisc has less bend, the plastic isn’t as shiny – it’s a bit matted, and the sound is a little bit higher pitch. The plastic is noticably different in the Eurodisc compared to the Aria & Ultrastar. I haven’t tried the Aria in extreme weather conditions so it’s hard to say how it behaves in those conditions – maybe that’s for a future video.
In the wind it was behaving very similar – maybe slightly more stable.

Let’s have a look at some throws.
The first throw I try out is an outside-in sidearm, mid-range, quite high and loopy so it drifts down. The flight paths are very similar but the Aria flattens out a bit more – which could just be the throw.
Next I try some hammers – quite often upsidedown throws can reveal the dynamics of a disc very well, in this instance all the throws look very similar, especially the shortest two, so no distinguishable difference whatsoever.
Next onto a flick which S-curves, to see how stable the disc is. If a disc is overstable, it’ll turn to the right here a lot quicker and dramatically than the Ultrastar, but the flight patterns are pretty much identical between all three discs.
Short/mid-range flat backhands going into a goal: the Aria, Eurodisc and Ultrastar were all very similar in this test.
Then long backhands – these are the throws where the Eurodisc would go slightly more inside-out towards the end. I thought the Aria might be overstable, and it may be by a fraction, but I wouldn’t say for certain – high level throwers would not notice that in a game.
Try some hammers… You can see the Aria has a bit more swing to it, but that could just be the throw.
Then long backhands downwind, as far as possible – I throw the Aria a bit higher and it ends up going further. Over all my testing, my throws were around 5% longer with the Aria, if I had to put a number on it – they definitely weren’t shorter.

So in summary: there’s a barely noticable difference in the shape – it’s not like when you catch a disc in a game and go to fake and realise what you’re holding is not an Ultrastar – with the Aria you can’t tell. I’ve introduced it in throwarounds where people haven’t noticed we’re not throwing with an Ultrastar. The flight path is practically identical to the Ultrastar, possibly slightly more overstable.
An Ultrastar can feel different when old & muddy & scratched up, although I’ve used the Aria a lot I haven’t got it to that point yet so it’s hard to say how it’d behave in those conditions.

Naturally I’m a bit hesitant about new discs because there’s nothing “wrong” with the Discraft Ultrastar – a new disc might mean I just need to relearn my throws a little bit, but there weren’t any problems with the Aria because the disc flies very similarly to the Ultrastar.
A little history lesson: Wham-O used to be the #1 disc supplier and the only official disc, right up until 1991 when there was a vote in America and it swayed to Discraft to be the official manufacturer, 7-6 in the vote. The deciding factor in that was: in 1988 there was a tournament where WhamO shipped a load of discs which were domed – they had been warped by the temperatures in their new manufacturing plant in Mexico, so they were unplayable and the tournament took a big loss because they couldn’t sell any discs, and people had to play games with the discs they had in their bags. After that, the TD was on the voting board when they voted between Discraft / Wham-O, and he told everybody what had happened at that tournament and swayed a couple of the voters – it’s only been since 1991 that Discraft has been the official disc for Ultimate.

I know that story because I have the book – “Ultimate: The First Four Decades” by Tony Leonardo (and Adam Zagoria) – really cool and full of interesting stories about Ultimate which are worth checking out if you love this game as I do!

Nowadays there are a few discs which are officially recognised by WFDF and the Aria is one of them, so you might be seeing it in competition soon.

This disc is called the Aria Uno. Aria is a company which is made by one of the Five Ultimate siblings (each of them have their own company in Ultimate now I think). Aria think that Ultimate is good for the world. They have a bunch of social partners, so every time you buy a disc they donate a disc to one of their social partners. You can read more about them on their website.

I hope you liked this review – if you want to buy one of the Aria discs you can head over to their website, or if you prefer the classic Ultrastar and you like the new felixultimate design (which is designed to look cool when it’s spinning) then head over to felixultimate.com where they’re on sale now!

I know it’s long & discordant as I recorded different bits at different times. I hope you enjoyed the different ways I looked at the different discs, if you did like this video then please give it a little like on YouTube, and subscribe if you want to see more!

Flags

Flags
2-7 players

flags-3pFlags is a simple game which adds training elements to a throw around. It will expose your weaknesses and challenge your strengths. Set out two markers (water bottles are good) a few yards apart, one directly downwind of the other – these mark the goal line – the windier it is, the longer the goal line should be. The higher the skill of the players (and/or the lesser the wind), the narrower the goal line.

2 players: Throw from where you catch, don’t cut for throws but do move to catch them. (1) Throw over the goal line at any height, (2) Throw around the far side of the goal [OI], (3) Throw around the inside of the goal [IO]

3 players: 2v1 – Rolling defender, cutting now encouraged. All players can move freely and pass on either side of the flags, but only passes across the goal line (at any height) count as goals. Goals reset a shot clock to prevent stalling, and the shot clock can be counted by the defender from anywhere on the field.

Felix, Will and Edgars play 3-player Flags.
3v2 / 4v3: More players can be brought in both on offence and defence, and the goal widened.

Experiment with different goal sizes, goal orientation to the wind, restricting the surrounding space with back lines, and so on. I recommend stalling from 4-10, as this is most game-like – mimicking the common situation where a thrower looks for a secondary option at stall 3. Let me know if you come up with some interesting rules or modifications yourself! As it was written on the back of the first frisbee – Play catch. Invent games. Have fun.